Difference between revisions of "Admass"

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'''Admass''' is a term coined in 1955 by JB Priestley for a social system based on [[consumerism]], driven by ''ad''vertising and the ''mass'' media.  In such a society, great emphasis is placed on the consumption of goods and services as giving meaning and purpose to life. According to Peter Leuner's entry in the ''Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought'', admass, beneath its glittering surface, promotes conformism and "distorts human feelings, needs, and emotions."<ref>Peter Leuner, "admass," and "mass society;" and Oliver Stallybrass, "consumer society," in ''The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought,'' 1977.</ref>
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'''Admass''' is a term coined in 1955 by JB Priestley for a social system based on [[consumerism]], driven by '''ad'''vertising and the '''mass''' media.  In such a society, great emphasis is placed on the consumption of goods and services as giving meaning and purpose to life. According to Peter Leuner's entry in the ''Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought'', admass, beneath its glittering surface, promotes conformism and "distorts human feelings, needs, and emotions."<ref>Peter Leuner, "admass," and "mass society;" and Oliver Stallybrass, "consumer society," in ''The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought,'' 1977.</ref>
  
 
For a more positive take on mass culture, see thinkers like [[Susan Sontag]] and [[Richard Poirier]], who perceive it as having anti-elitist, democratic, and inclusive tendencies which are desirable.<ref>Daniel Bell, "mass culture," in ''The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought.'' According to Mr. Bell, Sontag and Poirier frequently expressed their opinion in ''Partisan Review.'' He also cites Sontag, ''Against Interpretation,'' New York City, USA; 1966; and London, England, 1967.</ref>
 
For a more positive take on mass culture, see thinkers like [[Susan Sontag]] and [[Richard Poirier]], who perceive it as having anti-elitist, democratic, and inclusive tendencies which are desirable.<ref>Daniel Bell, "mass culture," in ''The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought.'' According to Mr. Bell, Sontag and Poirier frequently expressed their opinion in ''Partisan Review.'' He also cites Sontag, ''Against Interpretation,'' New York City, USA; 1966; and London, England, 1967.</ref>

Latest revision as of 19:52, 23 May 2017

Admass is a term coined in 1955 by JB Priestley for a social system based on consumerism, driven by advertising and the mass media. In such a society, great emphasis is placed on the consumption of goods and services as giving meaning and purpose to life. According to Peter Leuner's entry in the Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought, admass, beneath its glittering surface, promotes conformism and "distorts human feelings, needs, and emotions."[1]

For a more positive take on mass culture, see thinkers like Susan Sontag and Richard Poirier, who perceive it as having anti-elitist, democratic, and inclusive tendencies which are desirable.[2]

Related topic

Alienation

Notes

  1. Peter Leuner, "admass," and "mass society;" and Oliver Stallybrass, "consumer society," in The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought, 1977.
  2. Daniel Bell, "mass culture," in The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought. According to Mr. Bell, Sontag and Poirier frequently expressed their opinion in Partisan Review. He also cites Sontag, Against Interpretation, New York City, USA; 1966; and London, England, 1967.

External links

Neither of these sites mention admass, but they are nevertheless interesting: JB Priestley Society, JB Priestley "official" website.